What is the Product of Magnesium Bicarbonate and D-Ribose

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yerrag
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What is the Product of Magnesium Bicarbonate and D-Ribose

Post by yerrag »

I put d-ribose into a magnesium bicarbonate solution and it fizzed. So I wondered what could be going on. I used the Chemical Equation Balancer and this is what I got:

https://www.webqc.org/balance.php?react ... BCO2%2BH2O

What is Mg(C9H10O4)2? I can't find it on Google, Bing, or Yandex.

Thanks.
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ChenBeier
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Post by ChenBeier »

If die Ribose is acidic in Water, then dicarbonate will release CO2 and Water. But the product is wrong, Why should it loose oxygen.
Last edited by ChenBeier on Thu Mar 26, 2020 4:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
yerrag
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Post by yerrag »

Hmm.
??
That would explain why there is no such product on my search.

But I'm at a loss as to what magnesium compound would result from the reaction.

If d-Ribose is non polar, it should not lose an electron to become an anion, right?
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ChenBeier
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Post by ChenBeier »

Correct, but why do u want to mix it.
yerrag
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Post by yerrag »

I was just surprised that adding d-ribose to my magnesium bicarbonate drink would result in fizz, which signifies CO2 being released from a reaction.

I'm now curious as to what form of magnesium results. There was no precipitation of whatever form it is, it is soluble. Likely an organic acid but I don't know what.

It appears then that the d-ribose was just a catalyst for the magnesium bicarbonate to, for lack of a better word, to self-react and release CO2. The d-ribose seeded the reaction, is that the right way to say it?
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ChenBeier
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Post by ChenBeier »

Something must be acidic, otherwise no CO2 will be released. Which pH is the ribose dissolved in water?
yerrag
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Post by yerrag »

I finally realize what happened.

The magnesium bicarbonate didn't self-destruct. It stayed the same.

The d-ribose seeded (there's a better word for it) the dissolved CO2 that I failed to mention was in the water. CO2 started to come out from solution and this caused the fizz.

Thanks ChenBeier!
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