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isle
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Physical Science

Post by isle »

find the coeffiecient of:

Pt2O3 + CO2 = CO2

badly need asap thnxxx
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ChenBeier
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Re: Physical Science

Post by ChenBeier »

This reaction make no sense. On both side CO2?
Warner Mortensen
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Re: Physical Science

Post by Warner Mortensen »

If I am not wrong, your reaction is either not correct or you are missing some element on the products side. Although your reactant side looks fine enough however given their molecules and the elements, I do not think the products you are showing justify the statement. In order to find the coefficient, we need to make sure the reaction equation is fully balanced and that all reactants have turned into the products (in most cases). Hence, I would require you to develop a new equation or to go through your existing one and make sure it is correct because, at the moment, it is not right. And hence there is no way to actually proceed with it.
Going through your current equation, I think what you are trying to depict is that platinum nitrate is reacting with carbon dioxide, fair enough. However, you have shown that products are similar to one of the reactants i.e. carbon dioxide. Hence, I would like to bring forward a solution of what the product equation will look like. The final product equation will produce platinum dioxide and a single molecule of carbon monoxide.
You can write it roughly as:
  • Pt2O3+CO2→PtO2+CO
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ChenBeier
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Re: Physical Science

Post by ChenBeier »

I think its the same like in the spanish thread. To much Story for a already mentioned problem. And your equation is also not balanced.
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